Revealed: the common dietary mistakes you make before lunch – including eating in front of the TV, avoiding butter and sleeping late

  • Starting the day with a nutritious meal is essential for a healthy diet
  • But many Australians unintentionally make big mistakes during breakfast
  • Apparently healthy options such as granola contain an enormous amount of hidden sugar
  • Avoiding butter may seem like the right choice, but dieticians say this is not true
  • Other common slip-ups are sleeping late and eating in front of the TV

Health-conscious Australians may make major feeding errors before noon, thanks to seemingly harmless breakfast choices and morning routines.

Unlike regular education, butter is not all bad news because it helps the body absorb essential vitamins and make you feel full longer.

Sleeping and eating while watching TV makes you more likely to eat too much and therefore arrive, while smart snack options such as granola and flavored yogurt are not as healthy as you think.

Studies show that people who wake up later consume an average of 248 more calories per day than people who wake up earlier (stock image)

Studies show that people who wake up later consume an average of 248 more calories per day than people who wake up earlier (stock image)

PREVENT BUTTER

Although whole butter is often considered a caloric, cholesterol-raising spread, it also helps with satiety, which means that you feel fuller for longer.

Full fat butter contains nutrients that help the body absorb essential vitamins A, D, E and K, which play an important role in everything from vision to the functioning of the nervous system.

Use whole butter in moderation instead of low-fat alternatives that do not have the same nutritional benefits.

Whole butter helps the absorption of essential vitamins A, D, E and K and improves satiety, making you feel full longer (stock image)

Whole butter helps the absorption of essential vitamins A, D, E and K and improves satiety, making you feel full longer (stock image)

CHOOSING GRANOLA

Granola may seem like a healthy breakfast choice, but beware because it is often full of hidden sugars and preservatives.

Despite being marketed as healthy alternatives, coconut, agave and maple syrup will still dramatically increase your daily sugar intake.

JUICING

Although making juice seems a simple way to get you five a day, the bleaching process removes much of the pulp and fiber from fresh fruits and vegetables, essential for colon health and maintaining stable blood sugar levels.

Prolonged juice cleansing causes people to experience side effects such as headache, fatigue, lapsed concentration and stomach cramps.

Start your day with a piece of fruit and take advantage of many more nutritional benefits.

Granola is sold as a healthy breakfast choice, but is often packed with sugar and preservatives (stock image)

Granola is sold as a healthy breakfast choice, but is often packed with sugar and preservatives (stock image)

FOOD FOR THE TV

Multiple nutrition studies have shown that multitasking, such as chewing breakfast at work or while watching TV, leads to overeating.

Dietitians recommend taking time for each meal, chewing food slowly and eating consciously.

Slowing down and enjoying food can help keep your intake under control, an article from Harvard University.

Paying attention to a meal was linked to a reduced risk of binges later in the day.

Chewing your breakfast effortlessly while watching TV or looking at a computer increases the chance of overeating and binge eating later in the day (stock image)

Chewing your breakfast effortlessly while watching TV or looking at a computer increases the chance of overeating and binge eating later in the day (stock image)

Myth or truth: does fasting help you lose weight?

Fasting is an age-old practice, often done for religious reasons, but in recent years the concept has become best known as a road to rapid weight loss.

Intermittent fasting and juice detox plans are on the rise in some fitness fanatic circles, but while it is true that fasting will result in weight loss in the short term, the risks outweigh the benefits, because consistent fasting is more harmful then doing well.

In terms of weight loss, when the body starts fasting, it switches to conservation mode, which means that calories are burned more slowly.

More importantly, drastically reducing your calorie intake over longer periods of time causes health problems such as dizziness, headache, low blood sugar, joint pain and fatigue.

Long-term fasting can also lead to anemia, a weakened immune system, liver and kidney problems, irregular heartbeat and infertility.

Source: Webmd.com

SLEEPING TOO LATE

Late sleepers, who wake up after 10.45 am, consume an average of 248 more calories per day than those who get up earlier, a study by Northwestern Medicine found.

Researchers at Roehampton University also discovered that people who get up at 6.58 am are generally healthier, happier and slimmer than those who start their day at 8.54 am News.com.au reports.

SNACKING ON BAKED YOGURT

Although natural yogurt is rich in proteins, calcium and intestinal friendly bacteria, the flavored counterpart hides a multitude of less desirable ingredients.

Flavored yogurt, even those with a low fat content, often have a sugar content as high as 36 grams per tub.

Choosing a sugar-rich option such as strawberry yogurt for breakfast means that you get sugar for your first meal of the day, which increases the chance of craving for sugar later in the day.

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